Good Friday Agreement Nedir

The British Government is practically out of the equation and neither the British Parliament nor the people have, under this agreement, the legal right to hinder the achievement of Irish unity if it had the agreement of the people of the North and the South. Our nation is and will remain a nation of 32 counties. Antrim and Down are and will remain a part of Ireland, just like any county in the South. [20] On both sides of the Irish border, a referendum (similar to Brexit, but certainly not Brexit) was held, during which the people could decide whether or not they wanted the deal. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. The idea of the agreement was to get the two sides to work together in a group called the Northern Ireland Assembly. The Assembly would take certain decisions taken previously by the British Government in London. The two main political parties in the deal were the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), led by David Trimble, and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) led by John Hume. The two leaders together won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. The other parties involved in a deal were Sinn Féin, the Alliance Party and the Progressive Unionist Party. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which later became the largest unionist party, did not support the deal.

She left the talks when Sinn Féin and the loyalist parties joined because the Republican and loyalist paramilitary weapons had not been downgraded. . . .

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